ebenezerjonessdiary:

did-you-kno:

A Dutch artist turned his dead Ostrich into a helicopter. He calls it the OstrichCopter.

This is the same guy who had turned his dead cat into a helicopter few months back.

Isn’t this how the doctor in The Human Centipede started out?

why did he have an ostrich

(via ebenezerjonessghost)

secretqueens:

lol

secretqueens:

lol

(Source: gayindustrialcomplex, via basedandbiased)

“Ultimately, only certain extremists live in swamps. The violent extremist Anders Breivik was also given a habitat, but that of the lone wolf, magically extracted from the swamp of bloggers, politicians, activists and journalists that provided him with ideological sustenance and inspiration. Despite their violent presence on Britain’s streets, the swamp of the EDL is not listed for drainage.”

-Gavan Titley, writing in The Guardian

I like what Titley has to say about the effect language has on how we think about terrorism. I only wish that this article were longer, and talked more about the way “Islamic” terrorism is stripped of its context - the political/anti-colonialist motives of so-called “Islamic terrorists” are discarded in favour of a narrative that says, simply, “they attacked us because they’re Muslim, and therefore they hate us.” There’s no need to think about the context more deeply; no need to consider the decades (or centuries) of Western violence against the “Muslim world”,definitely no need to consider the violence levelled at individual countries or communities. “They hate our freedoms,” Bush said the week after September 11, and that’s been as far as the conversation has gone for most of the eleven years since then.

bin Laden himself saw it pretty differently: in his 1996 “Declaration of War against the Americans Occupying the Land of the Two Holy Places”, he makes it pretty clear his main concern is the presence of US troops in Saudi Arabia; it’s dressed in religious language, but his goal was a political one. (Since this is the internet, I feel like I need to clarify I’m not endorsing bin Laden or even commenting on the validity of his goals; I just think it’s important yo acknowledge that he didn’t hate “freedom”, he hated “America”, and those definitely aren’t interchangeable terms.)

More recently, look at the response to Lee Rigby’s murder; compare what his murderers said to what the media responded to. His killers deliberately targeted a soldier; they saw it as retaliation for the thousands (over a thousand in May alone) of victims of British and American foreign policy, embodied by soldiers like Rigby. Again, their argument uses religious language, and they may have felt solidarity with those victims because of their shared faith, but their actual motivations were as political as they were religious.

And then, look at the response to people like Breivik, or, the day before Rigby’s death, Dominique Venner (whose violence may have been self-directed, but that doesn’t guarantee it will be seen as apolitical - remember when the US government labelled the suicides of several Guantanamo detainees “asymmetric warfare”?) - both of whom explicitly stated their political goals, both of whom had explicitly Islamophobic goals. Venner had served a prison sentence for his membership in the Organisation de l’Armée Secrète! They’ve been stripped of their politics too, but instead of being reframed as the product of a “warped vision of Christianity”, they become just the actions of “crazy”, “sick” individuals (which is of course a problem in itself).

—-

…and while I’m rambling about the language of religion and violence, it would also have been good if there had been space to talk about how we use Islam as a metaphor for all religiously-related violence - in India, Hindu nationalists have been labelled the “Hindu Taliban”, the same with conservative Christians/Republicans in the US (both groups responsible for violence against Muslims, it should be pointed out) - neatly erasing the violent histories of other religious groups (why not the Hindu IRA? assuming it’s even necessary to compare “Hindu violence” to that of other religions), while reinforcing the idea that violence is a problem that’s inherent, and unique, to Islam.

not a photoshop

not a photoshop

clothes are hard ok

clothes are hard ok

internet feelings

i’m really angry with myself for how unhappy this is making me